Tuesday, August 16, 2022

Storm season peaks: Hurricane Florence still far from landfall, uncertainty remains for East Coast

After a slow start to the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season the tropics have come alive as several potential storms brew in the Atlantic.

Hurricane Florence has the potential to make landfall on the East Coast but it is still too early to tell (Port City Daily/Courtesy National Weather Service)
Hurricane Florence has the potential to make landfall on the East Coast but it is still too early to tell. (Port City Daily/Courtesy National Weather Service)

WILMINGTON — The 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season has been relatively quiet and the Cape Fear Region has gone largely untouched by any tropical systems — but that could all change next week as Hurricane Florence makes its way closer to the U.S.

Currently a Category 3 hurricane, Florence is still several days out from making any sort of landfall with Bermuda located in the “cone of uncertainty,” where the storm system may strike. There are also prediction models that put Wilmington in the path of Florence.

It is increasingly difficult to predict where a storm will track as the time period is extended and the National Hurricane Center has released its predictions for the storm up until Tuesday.

Several other potential storms also linger off the coast of Africa and could develop further.

Several potential storms are heading West from Africa as the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season continues (Port City Daily/Courtesy National Weather Service)
Several potential storms are heading West from Africa as the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season continues (Port City Daily/Courtesy National Weather Service)

“The tropics are becoming very active, which is typical since next week is the climatological peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. While Hurricane Florence will vary in intensity over the next several days, as it heads generally toward the west-northwest, a wide variety of scenarios next week have generated a lot of uncertainty as to whether or not this storm creates direct impacts anywhere along the U.S. East Coast or stays out at sea,” Steve Pfaff, warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington said.

“However, with a high level of certainty, the East Coast will begin receiving fore-runner swells from Florence this weekend. These swells will likely increase during next week and result in rough surf and dangerous rip current activity. Given the uncertainty, we encourage all interests along the U.S. East Coast to closely monitor the progression of Florence. Additional tropical waves farther to the east and southeast of Hurricane Florence could also develop into tropical systems,” he concluded.

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