Monday, June 27, 2022

Uh oh. Possible bad news for people planning to watch the 2017 eclipse in the Cape Fear

The latest from the National Weather service shows an area of cloud cover ranging from the Carolina's, to Florida. (Port City Daily photo / COURTESY NWS)
The latest from the National Weather service shows an area of cloud cover ranging from the Carolina’s to Florida. Cloud cover is shown in grey. (Port City Daily photo / COURTESY NWS)

WILMINGTON — Potential bad news for those planning on watching the upcoming solar eclipse. As a cold front moves in over the weekend, much of the southeast, including the Cape Fear region, is expected to have cloudy skies and the potential for severe weather on Monday afternoon. That’s according to the National Weather Service in Wilmington.

“We’ll have a cold front, pretty much just hanging over the area Monday,” Reid Hawkins, science officer for the National Weather Service said. “We’re expecting some low cloud cover to be hanging around in the afternoon, and could even see an isolated thunderstorm developing, of course, just in time for the eclipse.

“Right now there’s a 30 percent chance for thunderstorms in the Wilmington area. Cross our fingers that it won’t be too bad, but right now it looks like it should be partly to mostly cloudy,” Hawkins added.

So, where do you go to see the eclipse? Head north? Or maybe go south to the path of the total eclipse?

“If you go any farther north in North Carolina, you’ll be getting out of the path, with the total eclipse occurring in South Carolina,” Hawkins said. “It’s kind of hard to run away from here.”

Sadly, the latest forecast is showing poor weather conditions extending from the Carolina’s to Florida.

Your best bet? Head west.

According to current models, areas of Western North Carolina will be relatively free of cloud cover Monday afternoon.

Stay on top of the latest weather updates for Mondays solar eclipse, by checking the NOAA eclipse page at weather.gov. If all else fails, NASA will be live streaming the eclipse at eclipse2017.nasa.gov.


Get in touch with Reporter Cory Mannion: follow him on Facebook, Twitter, or send an email at cory@localvoicemedia.com.

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