Sunday, August 7, 2022

Brunswick Sheriff condemns Minneapolis Police officer’s conduct in killing of George Floyd

Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram is seeking a third term, facing off against Democratic candidate Charles Warren in November. (Port City Daily photo/Johanna Ferebee)
Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram is seeking a third term, facing off against Democratic candidate Charles Warren in November. (Port City Daily photo/Johanna Ferebee)

Update: Southport Police Chief Todd Coring and Shallotte Police Chief Scott Branning have also shared similar sentiments of disgust regarding the Minneapolis incident.

BRUNSWICK COUNTY — Issuing a rare public admonishment of another law enforcement agency, Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram has joined a growing group of leaders nationwide who are sharing disgust with the Minneapolis Police Department officers’ conduct in killing George Floyd.

Riots and protests have erupted nationwide since video surfaced that showed Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on the neck of George Floyd for nearly nine minutes, even after he became lifeless and despite his pleas that he couldn’t breathe.

In previous years and other high-profile cases involving lethal force, law enforcement leaders have waited until internal investigations wrap up to comment, if they choose to comment at all. Sharp condemnation from police chiefs and sheriffs across the county marks a major shift, with many saying they now feel staying silent can do more harm than good.

In a Facebook post Thursday afternoon, Sheriff Ingram explained the importance of speaking out against these actions instead of staying mum. “Those of us in the law enforcement community have, in many cases, taken a silent position on situations like this in the past for various reasons. As law enforcement professionals, we must set aside our fears, concerns and worries about speaking out against what we know to be wrong and hold ourselves and each other to a higher standard.

“Remaining silent only serves to enable such behavior and can lead to the public perceiving this type of behavior as being condoned by others in the law enforcement community,” Ingram wrote.

Read the full post below:


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