Mandatory water restrictions to continue through weekend for Cape Fear Public Utility Authority customers

PortCityDaily.com is your source for free news and information in the Wilmington area.

Crews are installing a byline to alleviate water issues while permanent repairs to the broken water main in Brunswick County can be made. Courtesy of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority.
Crews are installing a byline to alleviate water issues while permanent repairs to the broken water main in Brunswick County can be made. Courtesy of the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority.

Though repairs on the broken water main in Brunswick County are progressing, Cape Fear Public Utility Authority customers will continue to be under mandatory water restrictions through the weekend.

According to a release from the utility group, which services the City of Wilmington and much of unincorporated New Hanover County, seven different contractors are working to fix the line, which is owned by the Lower Cape Fear Water and Sewer Utility Authority. While a temporary byline, which will help the flow of water as crews continue to work on repairing the main line, is nearly installed, restrictions cannot be lifted until the fix is in place

“Because the bypass line needs to be in place and operation for a period of time before we feel confident enough that we can lift water restrictions, mandatory water restrictions will continue through this weekend,” the release stated. “Because CFPUA has additional sources of water, we are not in a state of emergency.  However, those additional sources are limited, making water conservation throughout our service area a top priority for everyone.”

Brunswick County Public Utilities customers are also under mandatory water restrictions, and the whole county is under a stage 2 state of emergency due to the water issues. Violators in both counties can be subject to fines after the first offense.

Though some CFPUA customers have reported discoloration and a sulfur-like smell in their water this week, officials have said that those issues are not related to the work going on in Brunswick County.

“While disconcerting for the customers, neither situation is tied to water quality,” the CFPUA stated in a release. “The chlorine level in the drinking water throughout our system is at a level that assures water safety. CFPUA implemented use of our emergency wells in consultation with local and state regulators and is constantly testing the water to ensure its safety.”

There are no boil water advisories currently in effect in either Brunswick or New Hanover counties. The CFPUA has compiled a document with answers to frequently asked questions about discoloration or smells that can be viewed here.